No specific precipiating features such as illicit drug use ie cocaine and metamphetamine. 2016 May-Jun;1(2):65-71. doi: 10.1016/j.pbj.2016.04.002. ADVERTISEMENT: Radiopaedia is free thanks to our supporters and advertisers. Newer imaging techniques, including high-resolution vessel wall imaging, may help in the future to better discriminate reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome from primary angiitis of the CNS, an important clinical distinction. Check for errors and try again. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a clinicoradiological condition that presents with recurrent severe headaches with or without concurrent focal neurologic signs. eCollection 2020 Jun. Complete resolution of vascular narrowing. 2 weeks of recurrent severe headache now with perisistent lower limb weakness and numbness (left greater than right). The diagnostic evaluation of a patient with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome integrates clinical, laboratory, and radiologic findings. A 60-year-old female patient presented with an episode of intense headache. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome - A narrative revision of the literature. Seizures have been described. Epub 2011 Feb 4. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a case series. Miller TR, Shivashankar R, Mossa-Basha M, Gandhi D. (2015) Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome, Part 1: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Clinical Course. 5). She had a personal history of recurrent migraines, hypertension and smoking. ACIM, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, Valencia, Spain. Six months later, a follow-up DSA showed a normalisation of the calibre of the vessels and of the contours of both carotid arteries (Fig. Edlow BL, Kasner SE, Hurst RW, Weigele JB, Levine JM. Follow-up digital subtraction angiography showed a normalisation of the calibre of the vessels and of the contours of both carotid arteries. Chen SP et al (2010) Magnetic resonance angiography in reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes. Sattar A, Manousakis G, Jensen MB. Laakso E, Pekkola J, Soinne L, Putaala J. J Clin Imaging Sci. Sequeiros JM, Roa JA, Sabotin RP, Dandapat S, Ortega-Gutierrez S, Leira EC, Derdeyn CP, Bathla G, Hasan DM, Samaniego EA. (2012) Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. Ann Neurol 67(5):648-56 (PMID: 20437562). AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 36:1580-8 (PMID: 25614476), [6] Follow-up MRI showed the resolution of the right frontal haematoma and the absence of the new brain lesions. 4). Spontaneous resolution of vasoconstriction over time thus not due to established angiitis. Vascular Medicine 20(3):256-265 (PMID: 25835347), [5] Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: the importance of follow-up imaging within 2 weeks. Ten days later, a follow up MRI was performed, showing an acute infarction of a small segment of the left occipital lobe, which is characterised by hyperintensity on DWI and T2-weighted images (Fig. Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov. T2*-weighted axial image showed a subarachnoid haemorrhage associated to a frontal parenchymal haematoma, characterised by hypointense signal. 3). Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. No subarachnoid hemorrhage. Lancet Neurol 11(10):906-917 (PMID: 22995694), [4] J Neurointerv Surg. 2020 Oct;41(10):1869-1875. doi: 10.3174/ajnr.A6772. Marder CP, Donohue MM, Weinstein JR et-al. DWI axial image showed a small hyperintense focus on the left occipital lobe, corresponding to an acute infarct. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe. Miller TR, Shivashankar R, Mossa-Basha M, Gandhi D. (2015) Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome, Part 2: Diagnostic Work-Up, Imaging Evaluation, and Differential Diagnosis. Imaging plays an important role by confirming the presence of cerebral vasoconstriction; monitoring potential complications such as ischemic stroke; and suggesting alternative diagnoses, including CNS vasculitis and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Epub 2014 Apr 10. 1). Ducros A. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a well-described clinical syndrome leading to vasoconstriction in the intracra- nial vessels, and has been associated with convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage and oc- casionally cervical artery dissection. Multiple sites of restricted diffusion especially in the right hemisphere (confirmed on ADC) associated with mutiple sites of arterial luminal narrowing especially on the right but also the left (anterior and posterior circulation). Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, Subarachnoid haemorrhage with intracranial vasospasm, Primary angiittis of the central nervous system, Brought to you by the European Society of Radiology (ESR) -. National Center for Biotechnology Information, Unable to load your collection due to an error, Unable to load your delegates due to an error. ADVERTISEMENT: Supporters see fewers/no ads. 2011 Sep;3(3):272-8. doi: 10.1136/jnis.2010.004242. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. USA.gov. Systematic review of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. This case is typical of reversible vasoconstriction ie a young woman with thunderclap headache and neurological deficit (in this case causing infarction). Digital subtraction angiography demonstrated marked segmental vasoconstriction in multiple small and medium-calibre vessels in the territory of both middle cerebral arteries and both anterior cerebral arteries (red arrows). Douglas Gonsales, Fabiano das Gracas, Roberta Santos, Pedro Aguilar-Salinas, Ricardo A. Hanel, Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome as an Unusual Complication of a Dural Arteriovenous Fistula treated with Onyx Embolization, World Neurosurgery, 10.1016/j.wneu.2018.04.211, 115, … The diagnostic evaluation of a patient with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome integrates clinical, laboratory, and radiologic findings. This case is typical of reversible vasoconstriction ie a young woman with thunderclap headache and neurological deficit (in this case causing infarction). Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a rare but increasingly recognized disorder with over 500 cases published in the literature.